Author Topic: Aging NPC Sim's?  (Read 4820 times)

Offline lisanmyers

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Aging NPC Sim's?
« on: February 25, 2013, 02:49:09 PM »
So I see a lot of the NPC Sim's getting older, which I never saw, or noticed before. They are getting older and dieing, so does that mean that the NPC Sim's are also getting married and having children? I think so, but I feel like my town, Sunset Vally, does not have enough NPC Sim's to my liking anyway. Is there a way to add more NPC? Rather then manually making and placing Sim's. Just quick questions.

Offline ladyaya

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Re: Aging NPC Sim's?
« Reply #1 on: February 25, 2013, 02:55:28 PM »
Every sim that's not in your household will age oddly. Some will be a teenager for three generations, others go from child to adult quickly. And story progression seems to be broken still passed putting sims together every now and again - they rarely marry or have children. Plus over time, families will die or move out, and new ones will move in, although the new ones won't be as interesting as the original townies.



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Offline lisanmyers

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Re: Aging NPC Sim's?
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2013, 03:03:04 PM »
So when Sim's die, other Sim's just appear and move in?

TheTripWasInfraGreen

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Re: Aging NPC Sim's?
« Reply #3 on: February 25, 2013, 05:54:14 PM »
Depends which NPCs you're referring to. Homeless NPCs actually can go steady and probably get married too (in my life states dynasty, it's really common to meet, say, a tattoo artist that's dating a local paparazzo or even one of the regular residents). Some will end up moving into town as regular residents too, depending on where you are.

Service NPCs age, but I don't think they're subjected to any sort of progression.

So when Sim's die, other Sim's just appear and move in?

Yes, and I think it also has to do with empty houses. For example, there's a mansion in Twinbrook that's right across from the dynasty lot; it's empty when you start the game but a generated family is there by the end of the first day, guaranteed.

Offline Wai

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Re: Aging NPC Sim's?
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2013, 08:12:12 PM »
Occassionally, story progression seems to stall and the town can become pretty empty.  I've noticed this a lot in Sunset Valley.  I've no idea if other town can become sparsely populated as I rarely play others.  In my recent Baby Boomer challenge file, the town was almost deserted by the end of the forth week and I had to use a little, legal, trick to get romanitic interests for each of my teenagers.

If you are not playing a challenge file the solution to the empty town is fairly easy.  Save your game and start a new game in another town.  Go straight to edit town and move the families you like the look of to the clipboard then save them to the bin.  Leave the game, don't bother to save, and return to your game.  You can then place these families into houses in your town.

Another trick (non challenge games only), if you want a few more children is to start a new, temporary game, turn cheats on and then pick on a couple you want to have children.  Play that household, use the cheat to get enough points to buy fertility treatement for both then "try for a baby".  Immediately after, return to edit town, move the couple to the clipboard then save to bin.  You now have a pregnant couple (probably triplets, to move into one of your houses in your actual game.  Make several pregnant couples at the same time if you wish.  Use a town you don't normally play or you will have multiple families with the same names in your game.

Both these methods are much quicker than creating families in CAS and of course, you retain a complete randomness in names and traits.  The pregnant couples trick is fun too especially when your town becomes full of little triplets ;D.
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